The Anhoek School
54 Dupont Street
Brooklyn, New York 11222

Mission Statement

Our aim is to foster a reckless kind of genius that rips across disciplines and is always conscious that the work of the classroom should not stay in the classroom. Are we a training camp? Are we an observatory? Are we a university? It is yet to be determined.

What is certain is that we opt for a hands-on examination of marginal pedagogies that stress horizontal teaching methodologies (i.e.: the student is not an empty vessel filled with the teacher's knowledge. The student is a free agent responsible for applying a certain rigor and specificity to their investigation, interpretation and school-based collaboration with the teacher) In keeping with this sentiment, future teachers will curate syllabi that ricochet between their own field of investigation and materials that confound their expertise. Students and teachers will aid one another in navigating theories, strange and beautiful or say, repulsive but persuasive.

Although students must be invested in critical theory, they must be comfortable with dwelling on the threshold of multiple disciplines. They will triangulate politics, aesthetics, and theory; they will not hoard the fruits of this trifecta. School papers must become pamphlets, 'zines, and broadsheets must circulate through the public; student crafted tests must transform themselves into a self-actualized memorandum for action; reports will, town-crier style, be released as pod casts, twitter updates, and park side manifestos.

Lastly, the teacher is not a product and the student is not a customer; both deserve to take scholarly risks and determine their own culpability (in regards to what has been learned, earned, and gained.) This differs from the current exchange model typical to most colleges and universities. We will do our best to work within a barter system, where students trade work for classes. Some will work in the garden; some will prepare meals; others will maintain the website, and still, others will determine other avenues of meeting the school's needs.

Mary Walling Blackburn